UNTITLED San Francisco 13.01.2017 – 15.01.2017
Peter Weibel, Self viewing as Self forgetting as Self darkening, 1974, Vintage black and white photographs mounted on paper, 31 x 47 cm
Peter Weibel, Self viewing as Self forgetting as Self darkening, 1974, Vintage black and white photographs mounted on paper, 31 x 47 cm 1/11
Peter Weibel, The Endless Sandwich, 1972, Black and white video with sound, 2 Min., 50 Sec.
Peter Weibel, The Endless Sandwich, 1972, Black and white video with sound, 2 Min., 50 Sec. 2/11
Analivia Cordeiro, M3x3, 1973, Computer Dance Video (still)
Analivia Cordeiro, M3x3, 1973, Computer Dance Video (still) 3/11
Analivia Cordeiro, Cambiantes Camera Takes Drawing, 1976, Felt pen and pencil on paper, 21,9 x 32,3 cm
Analivia Cordeiro, Cambiantes Camera Takes Drawing, 1976, Felt pen and pencil on paper, 21,9 x 32,3 cm 4/11
Kota Ezawa, Jimi Hendrix meets Josef Albers, 2016, LED Lightbox, 20 x 30 inches
Kota Ezawa, Jimi Hendrix meets Josef Albers, 2016, LED Lightbox, 20 x 30 inches 5/11
Kota Ezawa, Supercalifragilistic, 2016, Video, 30 Sec., Loop
Kota Ezawa, Supercalifragilistic, 2016, Video, 30 Sec., Loop 6/11
Federico Solmi, The Great Expedition, 2016, Acrylic paint, gold and silver leaf on plexiglass, Led screen, video loop (video still 1), 34 x 52 inches
Federico Solmi, The Great Expedition, 2016, Acrylic paint, gold and silver leaf on plexiglass, Led screen, video loop (video still 1), 34 x 52 inches 7/11
Federico Solmi, The Great Expedition, 2016, Acrylic paint, gold and silver leaf on plexiglass, Led screen, video loop (video still 3), 34 x 52 inches
Federico Solmi, The Great Expedition, 2016, Acrylic paint, gold and silver leaf on plexiglass, Led screen, video loop (video still 3), 34 x 52 inches 8/11
Sommerer & Mignonneau, Portrait on the Fly, 2015, Interactive Computer Installation (installation view)
Sommerer & Mignonneau, Portrait on the Fly, 2015, Interactive Computer Installation (installation view) 9/11
Sommerer & Mignonneau, Portrait On The Fly, 2015, Interactive Computer Installation (still)
Sommerer & Mignonneau, Portrait On The Fly, 2015, Interactive Computer Installation (still) 10/11
UNTITLED San Francisco, January 12 – 15, 2017
UNTITLED San Francisco, January 12 – 15, 2017 11/11

For the first edition of UNTITLED San Francisco, Anita Beckers will be showing the development of video and media art throughout the past decades. Beginning with Peter Weibel and Analivia Cordeiro, the BOOTH C7 will also feature works by San Francisco artist Kota Ezawa, renowned interactive media artists Sommerer & Mignonneau and New York-based artist Federico Solmi.

Selected artists: Analivia Cordiero, Kota Ezawa, Federico Solmi, Sommerer & Mignonneau & Peter Weibel

 

VIP and Press Preview on January 12th from 3 – 9pm
Open to the public: January 13th – 14th, 11am – 7pm / January 15th, 11am – 5pm

 

The video M3x3 (1973) by Analivia Cordeiro is accredited with being the first Brazilian video art piece, as well as, being, overall, the first video dance piece. This historical work, in black and white, is a pioneer in computer dance. It pushes the limits of the new and, at the time, unexplored practices in a society with little access to technology

Peter Weibel’s early works exerted a powerful influence over the generations to come. Specifically, one of his most distinctive contributions was to transform language and media into fields of action and to emphasize audience participation. Through his artistic practice, Weibel created a new theoretical context which affirmed individuality as a construct. As a pioneer of political performance, his works could be said to have anticipated the 21st century activism in the arts. In this sense, he was nicknamed ‘media rebel.’ As well, he was one of the founders of and coined the term, Wiener Aktionismus (Viennese Actionism). Today, he is considered one of the leading experts in the field of technology based art. Currently, he is director of the ZKM Center for Art and Media in Karlsruhe, Germany.

Sommerer & Mignonneau are considered pio-neers of interactive art. They have been exploring the limits of technology since the 1990s. Their newest interactive installation, Portrait on the Fly, consists of a monitor that shows a swarm of a few thousand flies. When a person positions himself in front of it, the insects try to detect his facial features. They then begin to arrange themselves so as to reproduce what they see and recreate a recognizable likeness of the individual. The portraits are in constant flux. Portrait on the Fly is a commentary on our love for making pictures of ourselves (Selfie-Culture). It has to do with change, transience and impermanence.

Exploring the ways we use history and its constructions, San Francisco-based artist Kota Ezawa describes his own practice as a form of “video archaeology.” Using iconic archival news or film footage, Ezawa addresses how we only remember the past through mediated images – from television, newspapers, cinema – and the dangers which this entails.

Federico Solmi’s works often combine articulate installations composed of different media such as video, drawings, mechanical sculptures and paintings. Irreverent, sur-realistic, the videos and the works by Solmi are extravagant, rowdy and ironic. They are satires about the evilness and the vices that affect contemporary society and mankind. Using images culled from the video game industry, pop culture, and the Internet, Solmi creates collages with a historical influence to produce original artworks about the seemingly disparate subject at hand.