William Lamson

In the Roaring Garden (video still), 2014, 4K to 1080 P Video, 18:31 min.  <br>Originally commissioned for a show at the deCordova Museum entitled Walden Revisited, In the Roaring Garden, (2014) involved the creation of floating camera obscura, to record a video of the landscape as it was projected upon a 1:5 scale model of Thoreau’s cabin reimagined as an artist studio. In the resulting video, a projected image of the landscape moves slowly over the interior of the one room cabin illuminating the walls, furniture and tools within the space. Over the course of the 18 minute video, trees, clouds and sunlight animate these objects as the sun rises and sets creating virtual days and nights.
In the Roaring Garden (video still), 2014, 4K to 1080 P Video, 18:31 min.
Originally commissioned for a show at the deCordova Museum entitled Walden Revisited, In the Roaring Garden, (2014) involved the creation of floating camera obscura, to record a video of the landscape as it was projected upon a 1:5 scale model of Thoreau’s cabin reimagined as an artist studio. In the resulting video, a projected image of the landscape moves slowly over the interior of the one room cabin illuminating the walls, furniture and tools within the space. Over the course of the 18 minute video, trees, clouds and sunlight animate these objects as the sun rises and sets creating virtual days and nights. 1/15
Untitled (Cabin), 2014, Digital C Print, 73,66 x 109,22 cm
Untitled (Cabin), 2014, Digital C Print, 73,66 x 109,22 cm 2/15
In the Roaring Garden (Rotation) (video still), 2015, Video, 9 min. <br>In contrast to the sublime stillness of watching a projected image of the landscape move across the static objects of an artist studio, In the Roaring Garden (2015) disrupts this illusionistic space by closing the aperture to the outside world and physically rotating the model upside down. The result is an uncanny choreography of furniture sliding up walls while shafts of light periodically illuminate the windowless interior through the narrow cracks between the floor, walls and ceiling. The entire set, model, props and rotating armature, floats upon a raft on the Hutchinson river in the Bronx, NY. Located at the edge of New York’s northern most borough whose numerous transportation networks and massive public housing infrastructure surrounds this site from three sides, this landscape remains entirely invisible in the video, yet its presence is felt through the drone like sound of passing cars.
In the Roaring Garden (Rotation) (video still), 2015, Video, 9 min.
In contrast to the sublime stillness of watching a projected image of the landscape move across the static objects of an artist studio, In the Roaring Garden (2015) disrupts this illusionistic space by closing the aperture to the outside world and physically rotating the model upside down. The result is an uncanny choreography of furniture sliding up walls while shafts of light periodically illuminate the windowless interior through the narrow cracks between the floor, walls and ceiling. The entire set, model, props and rotating armature, floats upon a raft on the Hutchinson river in the Bronx, NY. Located at the edge of New York’s northern most borough whose numerous transportation networks and massive public housing infrastructure surrounds this site from three sides, this landscape remains entirely invisible in the video, yet its presence is felt through the drone like sound of passing cars. 3/15
In the Roaring Garden, Installation view at Galerie Anita Beckers, 2015
In the Roaring Garden, Installation view at Galerie Anita Beckers, 2015 4/15
HYDROLOGIES represents two interventionist projects set in opposite hemispheres in which the reciprocal acts of adding and removing water from the landscape become catalysts for generative works. Hydrologies Atacama involved irrigating linear sections of the Atacama desert in Chile with the hopes of activating the dormant seeds and creating a line of flowers across the landscape. In Hydrologies Archaea, I performed an inversion of this action by removing gallons of super saline water from the Great Salt Lake near Spiral Jetty and installing it in an array of glassware at UMOCA two months prior to the opening of the exhibition. As the water evaporates, the salt crystals move over the edge of the glasses and down the sides, enveloping the vessels in a thick layer of salt that continues to spread out onto all the adjacent surfaces.
HYDROLOGIES represents two interventionist projects set in opposite hemispheres in which the reciprocal acts of adding and removing water from the landscape become catalysts for generative works. Hydrologies Atacama involved irrigating linear sections of the Atacama desert in Chile with the hopes of activating the dormant seeds and creating a line of flowers across the landscape. In Hydrologies Archaea, I performed an inversion of this action by removing gallons of super saline water from the Great Salt Lake near Spiral Jetty and installing it in an array of glassware at UMOCA two months prior to the opening of the exhibition. As the water evaporates, the salt crystals move over the edge of the glasses and down the sides, enveloping the vessels in a thick layer of salt that continues to spread out onto all the adjacent surfaces. 5/15
Hydrologies (installation view), 2014, HD Video, 11:07 min.
Hydrologies (installation view), 2014, HD Video, 11:07 min. 6/15
Hydrologies Archaea (installation view), 2014
Hydrologies Archaea (installation view), 2014 7/15
A Line describing the Sun (video still), 2010, Video Installation 13:35 min.
A Line describing the Sun (video still), 2010, Video Installation 13:35 min. 8/15
A Line Describing the Sun (video still), 2010, Video Installation, 13:35 min.
A Line Describing the Sun (video still), 2010, Video Installation, 13:35 min. 9/15
A Line Describing the Sun , 2010, Installation View
A Line Describing the Sun , 2010, Installation View 10/15
Time is like the East River (video still), 2009, Video, 3:36 min.
Time is like the East River (video still), 2009, Video, 3:36 min. 11/15
Automatic (video still), 2009, HD Video, 7:41 min.
Automatic (video still), 2009, HD Video, 7:41 min. 12/15
Hunt and Gather (video still), 2008, Two Channel HD Video, 15 min.
Hunt and Gather (video still), 2008, Two Channel HD Video, 15 min. 13/15
Tundra (video still), 2008, HD Video, 3:55 min.
Tundra (video still), 2008, HD Video, 3:55 min. 14/15
Emerge (video still), 2007, HD Video, 2:10 min.
Emerge (video still), 2007, HD Video, 2:10 min. 15/15

“My work intervenes with natural forces and cultural systems to explore ideas of power and human agency. Through the use of homemade props and low-tech devices I engage directly with these forces as a performer or, by passively allowing my constructions to function on their own. In both systems chance and determinism become dominant factors.”  (William Lamson)

William Lamson is an interdisciplinary artist whose diverse practice involves working with elemental forces to create durational performative actions.   Set in landscapes as varied as New York’s East River and Chile’s Atacama Desert, his projects reveal the invisible systems and forces at play within these sites.  In all of his projects, Lamson’s work represents a performative gesture, a collaboration with forces outside of his control to explore systems of knowledge and belief.  Lamson’s work has been exhibited widely in the United States and Europe, including the Brooklyn Musuem, The Moscow Biennial, P.S.1. MOMA, Kunsthalle Erfurt, the Musuem of Contemporary Art, Denver, and Honor Fraser Gallery in Los Angeles.  In addition he has produced site specific installations for the Indianapolis Musuem of Art, the Center For Land Use Interpretation, and Storm King Art Center.   His work is in the collections of the Brooklyn Museum, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Indianapolis Musuem of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston and a number of private collections.   He has been awarded grants from the Shifting Foundation, the Experimental Television Center, and most recently he is 2014 Guggenheim Fellow.   His work has appeared in ArtForum, Frieze, the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the New Yorker, Harpers, and the Village Voice.  William Lamson was born Arlington, Virginia and lives in Brooklyn, New York.  He earned his MFA from Bard College, and he teaches in the Parsons MFA photography program and at the School of Visual Arts.